April 22, 2021

Missed Diagnosis or Misdiagnosis? Population Considerations and Clinical Comorbidities Contributing to Delayed Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder

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Friday, June 11, 2021

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m. MST

1.5 CE hour (UPA & NASW-UT) 

Register* here: https://form.jotform.com/211016371639148

*If you cannot attend the live event, you can still receive the video recording, presentation slides, and CE credit so long as you register beforehand.

About the presentation:

With Utah having one of the highest rates of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in the United States, the community relies on clinicians to provide early identification and intervention for this pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder. Although the last several decades have witnessed an increase in awareness and support for individuals on the spectrum and their families, many people with ASD are not receiving diagnoses and subsequent services until they are older children, adolescents, or even adults.

As research continues to grow, the field is discovering complexities that alter our recognition and understanding of ASD. This presentation will discuss demographic characteristics impacting identification, such as the “female autism phenotype,” autism in racial and ethnic minorities, and the intersection of ASD and LGBTQA+ identities. Furthermore, this talk will present evidence-based guidelines for differential diagnosis and present specific disorders that mimic or mask underlying ASD, including ADHD, OCD, and personality disorders.

Following the hour-long presentation, there will be a 30-minute Question and Answer period.

About the presenter:

Laura Rowley, Ph.D., licensed clinical psychologist. Laura obtained her doctorate from Wayne State University. She completed her APA-accredited internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Primary Children’s Hospital. Laura is currently the Program Coordinator for the Assessment and Testing Team and Utah Center for Evidence Based Treatment, where she provides testing services for children and adults.